Link to article "The Risks of Imitating Designs" by Nielsen Norman Group

The Risks of Imitating Designs

Too many times, I saw teams wanting to pursue unusable and inaccessible designs because Amazon, Google or Apple was doing it. Here's a concise article from Nielsen Norman Group on why those companies aren't always worth emulating.

An illustration of a walking skeleton with a cane, wearing a judge gown and a court wig. It claims: "The only and only cardinal sin in design is not designing for the reality in which people live."

The Little Book of Accessibility

This article (it's not a proper book) wrote by Gareth Ford Williams has several different quips, tips, affirmations, and truth that worth to be read and read again.

Illustration: Gareth Ford Williams

Closeup of an old Mustang car

Everyone needs a good mechanic.

My friend, Nicolas Steenhout, published a few years ago a story about how his mechanic discovered why accessibility is good for business.

Closed-up of wood types.

Testing fonts for accessibility

A bite-sized guide to help you chose fonts with better legibility for all.

Learn How to Build Accessible Web Apps

Wow that is a super nice initiative! Marcy Sutton offers a free six weeks email course to help you building and testing accessible web applications.

Illustration: testingaccessibility.com

Screen copy of the article "By the way, we need to make this website accessible"

By the way, we need to make this website accessible

JoLynne Martinez, like many developers or designers, heard about web accessibility only once in the field. Her story reflects the common experience met by people who want to start doing accessible code or design: finding some help and resources adapted for beginners.

Extract of Rian Rietveld's article: "blind people don't visit my site."

Blind people don’t visit my website.

Rian Rietveld, an accessibility specialist, asked to non-disabled people what are their greatest frustrations and hurdles are while using the web. Spoiler alert: everyone benefits from an accessible web!

A magnifying glass with an eye in the center of the glass.

It’s illegal to have an inaccessible website in Norway

In Norway, the law requires that public and private sector websites follow the WCAG criteria. This article highlights how this law has since changed mentalities and conversations between clients, designers, and developers.

Example of paired cards.

Cards for Humanity

Cards for Humanity is a practical tool to help you design more inclusively.
How to play? Deal two cards: a person and a trait. Together they make a random user scenario. You can use this scenario to test your concepts, products or from a different perspective.