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Accessibility Talks

Accessibility Talks is a virtual meet-up group that started in 2017 that features speakers and conversations around the topic of digital accessibility. They share each of their monthly talks on their website and on their YouTube Channel.

Screencopy of Voice Over's Welcome panel

An Introduction to macOS Voice Control

The Designer and A11Y advocate, Eric Bailey shows how to enable Voice Control and explains how to design for it. This article is also a great reminder about the importance of labelling buttons and icons!

Presentation of Atkinson Hyperlegible typeface

A free hyperlegible typeface from the Braille Institute

The Atkinson Hyperlegible font a new typeface was designed with a greater legibility and readability for low vision readers. The Braille Institute has the generosity to make it free for anyone to use.
By the way, A11y Toolbox uses for the body content the Atkinson Hyperlegible!

Devon Persing saying hello when starting her virtual talk. She is sitting behind her computer, in her home office. On the wal, behind her, some illustrations are hanged up. One is a cute pink owl and a poster saying "You are enough"

Accessibility is Hard, and Other Myths – Devon Persing

During this Accessibility Talks virtual meet-up, Devon speaks about common misconceptions about digital accessibility work and introduces ways to think about disability, assistive technology, and a more holistic approach to accessibility.

Extract of the original article "Building an accessibility Library"

Building an Accessibility Library

An interesting article about how providing designers accessibility tools have helped them to apply their knowledge and develop a greater understanding of accessibility.

A lock

Stop Password Masking

Masking passwords is an old practice that’s commonly implemented in sign-up and log-in forms. But masking passwords doesn't even increase security, but it costs your company business due to login failures.

A designer designing with all his heart

WCAG for designers

A checklist wrote by the British Designer Gari Reid to help designers ensure the product they design comply with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

(I personally keep it into my favorites!)

Dyslexia: seeing more than a regular brain allows (we see the bigger picture)

Dyslexia fonts

Dyslexia affects about 1 in 5 people worldwide. I am one of them! I appreciate the article questions the utility of Dyslexic fonts. And it gathers general font tips to help to improve the overall quality of your website's typography.

Original Illustration: Harriet Birt

A copy screen of how to fill the Alt Text field on Worpress. The image is my English Bull Terrier dog, Fran, smiling for a photo in a park.

How to write better alt-text descriptions for accessibility

Adding alt-text to images is an important aspect of web accessibility. But do you know how to write a good alt-text description? And... have a look on the comments, they are also interesting.

Example of paired cards.

Cards for Humanity

Cards for Humanity is a practical tool to help you design more inclusively.
How to play? Deal two cards: a person and a trait. Together they make a random user scenario. You can use this scenario to test your concepts, products or from a different perspective.

Ebook cover of Accessibility for Digital Experience

Accessibility for Digital Experiences 101

This is a comprehensive guide for those who need practical tips for designing digital products more accessible.
Personal note: even if that guide is about starting accessible digital products, I profoundly regret it was designed (and validated!) with so poor contrast-ratios!

Free e-book (pdf format)

The six Do & Don't poster covers

Design for Accessibility: Six Do and Don’t posters

Since I'm learning to design for accessibility, I had to undesign a part of the design process taught during my design studies. The six Do and Don't posters on designing for accessibility released by the Home Office Digital have helped my Undesig Process.